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Hands On Safety iA Cast

SafetyCast 2 Calling For Help

Show Description

Leslie, George and Meaghan discuss setting up the fastest ways to contact people in the event of an emergency and providing medical information for first responders. Leslie demonstrates setting up Emergency SOS settings in iOS and talks about the settings for the Apple Watch app. George demonstrates adding emergency contacts for android users. The team also discusses setting up medical ID information, fall detection on the Apple Watch and third-party apps. Some of them listed as the Top 5 apps to keep you safe. For more details about the apps discussed, read Meaghan’s review.

Providing Feedback

We want to hear from you, so please send an email to feedback@handsonsafety.net. You can follow us on Facebook and Twitter. . Soon, you will also be able to find us on the web, for resources and other safety related topics.

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iA Cast iA GameCast

#iAGameCast 17 – Audio Rush

Show Description

On this episode, Aleeha and Jason demo a fun little game called Audio Rush.

Providing Feedback

We love hearing from you, so feel free to send an email to feedback@iaccessibility.net. You can follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. You can also find us on Reddit, and all around the web. Also, don’t forget to check out our YouTube page, and for all things iACast, check out our iACast page. If you’d like to help support us, you can do so via our PayPal and Patreon pages. If you wish to interact with us during our podcasts live then please do join us on our Slack channel.

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iA Cast iA Cast Weekly

#iACast 140 – Staying Productive In The New Year

Show Description

On this episode, Michael, Aleeha, Leslie, and Jason discuss apps that help them stay fit, productive, and safe online, as we enter the new decade. To that end, if you’re interested to see if any accounts have been hacked, you can visit Have I been pwned. Just enter your email address, and hit the “Powned?” Button.

News

The coronavirus is upending the tech industry’s supply chain, affecting the ability of companies such as Apple, to keep up with consumer demand.

Picks

Aleeha: AirPods Pro

Leslie: A Blight of Blackwings by Kevin Hearne

Jason: Locke And Key

Michael: [Incase compact nylon sleeve](https://www.apple.com/shop/product/HNQ32ZM/A/incase-compact-sleeve-in-flight-nylon-for-16-macbook-pro-and-15-macbook-pro?fnode=9e&fs=fh%3D4598%252B4c0f)
Providing Feedback

We love hearing from you, so feel free to send an email to feedback@iaccessibility.net. You can follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. You can also find us on Reddit, and all around the web. Also, don’t forget to check out our YouTube page, and for all things iACast, check out our iACast page. If you’d like to help support us, you can do so via our PayPal and Patreon pages. If you wish to interact with us during our podcasts live then please do join us on our Slack channel.

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iA Cast iA Cast Weekly

#iACast 131 – What’s New In iOS 13

Show description

On this episode, Aleeha, Jason, Meaghan and Michael talk about and demonstrate some of the new Voiceover improvements and bugs in IOS 13.

Ad

App development services

News

New iPhones are out.
The release for IOS 13.1 has been pushed up to Sept. 24.
Apple Care is now subscription based.
Apple Care is now available for AirPods and Beats headphones.

Picks

Meaghan: IOS 13
Jason: Focus 40 Blue Braille Display
Aleeha: Telegram Messenger
Michael: iPhone 11 Pro Max

Providing Feedback

We love hearing from you, so feel free to send an email to feedback@iaccessibility.net. You can follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. You can also find us on Reddit, and all around the web. Also, don’t forget to check out our YouTube page, and for all things iACast, check out our iACast page. If you’d like to help support us, you can do so via our PayPal and Patreon pages. If you wish to interact with us during our podcasts live then please do join us on our Slack channel.

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iA Cast iA Cast Weekly

#iACast 129 – What Is An App

Show description

On this episode, Michael and Jason discuss the fundamental definition of an app. They also discuss some of the differences between Mac, Windows, iOS, and Android apps, and the methods for developing them.

News

Android 10 has been released.
Apple’s September 10th event will be held at the Steve Jobs Theater.

Ad

SwiftUI Training by iAccessibility

Picks

Jason: The Big Bang Theory
Michael: The Powerbeats Pro

Providing Feedback

We love hearing from you, so feel free to send an email to feedback@iaccessibility.net. You can follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. You can also find us on Reddit, and all around the web. Also, don’t forget to check out our YouTube page, and for all things iACast, check out our iACast page. If you’d like to help support us, you can do so via our PayPal and Patreon pages. If you wish to interact with us during our podcasts live then please do join us on our Slack channel.

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Differences between iOS and Android App Development

Becoming a developer for any platform requires a lot of time, dedication, and will, but sometimes it helps to have resources out there to just read and learn from. iOS and Android are two platforms that dominate the industry, so lets take a look at these platforms, and what it takes to develop for them.

iOS Development

To develop for iOS, you MUST have a Mac. Once you have one, you will need to download Xcode, Apple’s development platform. This application lets you develop applications for both iOS and macOS. You will then need to learn a coding language supported by these operating systems. The most popular of these is Swift, but developers can still use Objective-C if that is what they are more interested in. Here are some great resources to get you started with these languages.

  1. The Swift Programming Guide for Swift 5 on Apple Books
  2. The Objective-C Programming Language – Apple Developer

iOS development is based on writing code around the user interface and user events. To help with this, Apple has created what are called Storyboards, where you can create each screen of your app graphically. If graphical design isn’t your thing, then you can create all of your app’s user interface objects through code. Each method has its strengths and weaknesses.

Once your app has been written, your assets are ready, and you are ready to test,  you should sign up for an Apple Developer account. This account will use your Apple ID, and it will cost you $100 in the US each year.

Once this is done, login to App Store Connect, and set up TestFlight testing which supports public testing now.

If your app is how you like it,  send it up to Apple for review. This can take up to 24 to 48 hours. Once this is done,  your app will be live in the App Store for anyone to download.

Android App Development

Android app development is very similar to iOS development in some ways but drastically different in others. Here is the process for building an app for Android.

To develop apps on Android, you will first need a program called Android Studio. Android Studio is an Integrated Developer environment similar to Apple’s Xcode. It allows you to build Android apps on multiple platforms. This means that you can build the same app on a Windows computer or on a Mac.

To start developing for Android, you first need to learn an Android supported programming language. There are ways you can build Android apps in Python and or with other programming languages, but Java and Kotlin is the preferred way to go, and is the supported language by Google and Android Studio at this time. Here are some resources to get you started.

  1. Documentation for Android Developers

With Android Studio, an app is built by programming around user interface elements and events, which is similar to iOS, but Android does not have anything like Storyboards. Instead, you will have to design each screen separately. These screens are called Activities, and the best way to think of this is that each activity is a separate app from other activities in your containing app. You basically just connect each activity together and send data back and forth.

Android Activities are basically a few files. The code files which are written in Java or Kotlin, and the layout files which are written in XML. You can write the layout files by hand, or you can use Android Studio’s visual designer. You will definitely find though that the Android studio visual designer will only get you so far in the process, and some hand writing of the user interface layout files will be needed. You can also opt out of layout files, and just write all of your user interfaces out of Java or Kotlin, but this will take longer unlike iOS development.

Once you write your app its time to test and begin the publication process. You will need to register as an Android developer at developer.android.com which has an initial cost of $20. Once you pay this then you are forever an Android Developer!

Publishing your app is very similar to the App Store Connect portal for iOS. This time, you will use the Google Play Developer console. You will have to have screenshots of your app and a description, and you will need to upload your app with Android Studio.

What Are The Differences?

iOS development and Android development have several things that are similar, but they have some very major differences. Many of these were outlined above, but lets look at everything now.

  • iOS development requires you to pay $100 a year to keep your apps in the App Store, whereas Google requires you to pay $20 up front to become an Android Developer for life.
  • Apple uses Xcode to build apps, whereas Android uses Android Studio to build apps and services.
  • Apple keeps their apps as a walled garden, meaning their access to other apps is limited,  where as Android lets your app talk to and see other apps on a device.
  • iOS developers use Swift or Objective-C to build apps, whereas Android developers use Java or Kotlin.
  • iOS app simulators are bare-bones versions of iOS that run effectively on macOS, where Android simulators are full versions of Android that may tax your machine a bit while debugging apps. This allows you to run Talkback while testing your apps, however. The iOS simulator is unable to run VoiceOver.
  • iOS apps may run in the background for certain reasons for a certain amount of time, but Android apps can install services to run indefinitely or until the app is closed.
  • iOS apps use storyboards or NIB files to build user interfaces, where Android apps use layout files which are written in pure XML. Android files are easier to edit by hand.

There are still many more differences between these two platforms that we have not had the chance to cover, but this should help any new developer know what they are getting into if they want to transition between either of these platforms.

Reach out to us on our Slack community if you would like to learn more, or email us at feedback@iaccessibility.net if you have any developer questions.

Categories
iA Cast iA DemoCast

#iACast DemoCast 18 – Seeing AI New Features

Show Description

On this episode, Jason gives a brief overview of the Seeing AI app for iOS, and then he demonstrates some of the newer features of the app. These include person recognition, exploring photos, and reordering/hiding channels. You can find Seeing AI on the App Store. For a more in-depth look, check out or original DemoCast.

Providing Feedback

We love hearing from you, so feel free to send an email to feedback@iaccessibility.net. You can follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. You can also find us on Reddit, and all around the web. Also, don’t forget to check out our YouTube page, and for all things iACast, check out our iACast page. If you’d like to help support us, you can do so via our Paypal and Patreon pages.

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iA Cast iA Cast Weekly

#iACast 108 – Accessibility Versus Inclusive Design

Show Description

On this episode of the iACast, Michael, Aleeha, Jason, and Lauren discuss accessibility versus inclusive design.

News Stories

iAccessibility Ad

iAccessibility offers Teamtalk hosting for $3 per month. Visit the iAccessibility web site for more details.

Picks

Jason: Garage Band

Lauren: Instacart

Aleeha: Clock In/Out iOS Shortcut

Michael: iMovie

Providing Feedback

We love hearing from you, so feel free to send an email to feedback@iaccessibility.net. You can follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. You can also find us on Reddit, and all around the web. Also, don’t forget to check out our YouTube page, and for all things iACast, check out our iACast page. If you’d like to help support us, you can do so via our Paypal and Patreon pages.

 

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Report

New Features in macOS 10.14 Mojave

MacOS 10.14 Mojave has been in the wild for quite some time, but we felt that it still bears discussion, as it comes with a few changes that will change how we view the Mac ecosystem.

Features

There are several features in macOS Mojave; however, only a few of these will be discussed. In this article, we will focus on the significant features that will keep changing in the future.

Dark Mode

MacOS 10.14 brings dark mode to the Mac, which allows applications to show content with a dark theme. This is different from smart invert for iOS as it only changes the interface and text colors. The one drawback to this is that developers must enable dark mode in their applications and it does not work out of the box.

Dynamic Desktops

One feature worth mentioning is Dynamic Desktops. Dynamic Desktops are modified desktops that can change based on certain conditions. Right now, this means that the desktop can change based on the time of day, so you can have a lighter background and skin while it is bright outside, or you may have a darker background with dark mode enabled at night. This is really useful if you would like to adjust your working environment based on the time of day.

Desktop Stacks

So, wouldn’t it be amazing if you could make a stack of items on your desktop instead of just in the Dock? Well, you can now! Mojave supports the ability to make stacks on your desktop.

Continuity Camera

macOS Mojave allows you to take pictures with your iPhone or iPad and have that picture go directly to your Mac. One issue that users have found is that the phone can not have personal hotspot enabled when this is used.

Mac App Store

The Mac App store received a full redesign this year, with an all new interface.

iOS Apps On The Mac

An ongoing project was started in 2018 to allow iOS apps work on the Mac. This is a huge change for the Mac, as it allows iOS developers to run their apps on the Mac. Unfortunately, this feature is only enabled in certain apps from Apple like Home, News, Stocks, and Voice Memos. Apple has stated that they would be bringing more support to iOS apps on the Mac in 2019.

Accessibility Improvements

VoiceOver and Zoom did not receive much of a noticeable update this year, but there have been obvious under the hood changes to VoiceOver to support the new iOS apps that have been added to the Mac. We noticed these changes throughout the Mojave beta process.

Conclusion

While Mojave has not seen the most accessibility updates, it surely has several updates to pay attention to, and lets be honest, Dark Mode is a great feature for low vision users if the brightness of the screen is too much or if the added contrast helps you read the interface easier.

MacOS Mojave has set the stage for future versions of macOS, but we will definately see even more changes to the OS later this year when we receive macOS 10.15.

 

Let us know what your thoughts are about macOS by emailing us at feedback@iaccessibility.net

Categories
iA Cast iA Cast Weekly

#iACast 106: iOS Access for All

Show Description

Michael, Aleeha and Jason bring a guest to the iAccessibility network. Shelly talks with them all about her new iOS Access for All book that covers iOS 12. There are a few surprises as well. This is one you don’t want to miss!

News Stories

iAccessibility Ad

iAccessibility Hosting Plans.

Picks

Providing Feedback

We love hearing from you, so feel free to send an email to feedback@iaccessibility.net. You can follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. You can also find us on Reddit, and all around the web. Also, don’t forget to check out our YouTube page, and for all things iACast, check out our iACast page. If you’d like to help support us, you can do so via our Paypal and Patreon pages.

 

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Report

Twitterrific Keystrokes for iOS and Mac

Iconfactory has created one of the best applications for using Twitter for iOS and macOS, and they have also created an amazing set of keystrokes for users who like to navigate applications with the keyboard. Below is a link to Iconfactory’s list of keystrokes that you can use to navigate the Twitterrific application.

Twitterrific Keystrokes for iOS and macOS

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iAccessibility 1.4 for iOS

iAccessibility is proud to announce that version 1.4 of our app has been released to the app store. This version includes new shortcuts to start and stop playback of our live stream, and a shortcut to listen to our ten latest episodes. You must first perform these actions in the app for Siri to find them, but you can then use the settings app to add a phrase with Siri to activate these features while your phone is unlocked. We have also made bug fixes to the app, and we will have more to come shortly.

Download app: iAccessibility for iOS